Air Force Speeds up Rollout of New Operational Camouflage Pattern Uniforms


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Air Force Times

Last May, the Air Force announced its plans to adopt “the Army’s OCP as its official utility uniform.” The OCP, or Operational Camouflage Pattern, was chosen for its “improved fit and comfort,” and airmen were given the choice to start wearing it in October. The OCP was also made available for purchase at exchange stores on select bases that month, too.

This year, the service plans to speed up the rollout of OCPs across all areas.

More exchange stores will have the OCP available for purchase this April. The Army & Air Force Exchange Service also plans to make the uniform available for purchase online in October.

And beginning in April 2021, it will be mandatory for all airmen to transition from the Airman Battle Uniform (ABU) to the OCP.

As for other uniform changes, the Air Force is also making plans to update the jacket for the dress blues uniform along with its physical training uniforms.

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New Jungle Camouflage Uniforms Coming June 2019


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Marine Corps Times

For the last several years, the U.S. Marine Corps has been testing a new, lightweight jungle camouflage uniform.

After finalizing the design, the Corps awarded $954,713 to SourceAmerica in Vienna, Virginia to produce the new uniform.

The first uniforms are expected to be available for purchase in exchanges “around June,” and will be useful as marines continue to rotate throughout the Pacific.

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Guidelines for OCP Patches Now Available


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

According to a statement made by air force officials last week, unit patches for the OCP, or Operational Camouflage Pattern uniforms “will be limited to just four colors.” These colors are black, olive drab, spice brown, and Bagby green.

Patches will be created using each unit’s “approved Air Force emblem,” as stated by Capt. Carrie Volpe. Units who wish to change their current emblem must contact their supervisor or unit commander so they can “consult the base’s installation historian” to get the process started. Ideas for new emblem designs may be submitted by anyone – as long as it is through their typical chain of command.

While the OCP has been approved for wear since October 1, it will not be mandatory for airmen until April 1, 2021. On the OCP, officer rank and enlisted rank insignia will be spice brown, with the exception of first lieutenant and lieutenant colonel insignia – those will be black. Patches in the approved colors “will follow suit.”

The old ABU and new OCP uniforms are not to be mixed and matched “in any way.”

To provide personnel with further guidance on how to wear the new uniform, the air force updated its Air Force Instruction 36-2903 for “Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel” in July. A comprehensive list of guidelines for wearing the OCP can be found in the AFI.

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Here’s What the U.S. Air Force’s New PT Uniform Could Look Like


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

The air force is currently considering design updates for its physical training (PT) uniforms in order to provide airmen with “more modern and form-fitting clothing options.” Indications that current uniforms were under review to possibly be replaced with new uniforms were made by Chief Master Sergeant Kaleth O. Wright in August.

And, thanks to a presentation that was recently leaked to the Air Force Amn/Nco/Snco Facebook page, we now have an idea of what the updated uniform may look like. The presentation, which is titled “Physical Training Uniform Development,” features eight different pieces of attire in the air force’s traditional blue and grey colors.

However, according to a spokesperson for the air force, Maj. Allison Kojak, a “final decision” regarding the updated uniforms, costs, and timelines “has not been made,” so airmen will have to wait.

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Female Marine Graduates First to Wear New Dress Blues Coat


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

Starting in 2013, the United States Marine Corps began moving forward with its initiatives to design, prototype, and wear test a new dress blues coat for female marines. The coat was designed to resemble the male uniform to display a “more unified look,” according to a service release.

After years in the making, the finished product is finally being debuted.

Female marines with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot on Parris Island in South Carolina debuted the new coat during their graduation ceremony on November 16.

In order to finalize the garment, the Marine Corps Systems Command conducted “extensive research with female marines” and visited “I and II Marine Expeditionary Forces” to conduct 3 different surveys with over 2,000 marines.

After a lengthy research process, a final design was selected – one which should leave no room for doubt.

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U.S. Army Might Stop Issuing Dress Uniforms During Basic Training


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

Typically, the U.S. army will issue dress uniforms to new recruits at the beginning of their basic training regime. This may all be changing soon, though, as army officials are considering issuing new Army Greens uniforms to soldiers when they “go to their first unit,” instead of during training.

The service plans to begin issuing the WWII Pinks and Greens-inspired uniforms in summer 2020. However, instead of issuing them at the start of basic training as is tradition, things may be postponed until soldiers complete their Initial Entry Training, so the new uniforms are not given to soldiers who fail to complete the full training regime.

As stated by Col. Stephen Thomas, head of Project Manager Soldier Protection & Individual Equipment, it all “boils down to attrition.” From the “110,000 recruits who go to basic training” only around “104,000 make it to Advanced Individual Training,” Thomas said.

According to army officials, the Army Greens uniform will come at a higher cost than the current Army Service Uniform (ASU), but only because it’s of better quality. It should “last six years compared to the ASU’s four-year life.” Issuing the new uniforms later is another way the service plans to control costs.

Soldiers who have completed training will have until 2028 to purchase their new uniforms. After the Army Greens phase in is complete, the ASU will “become the service’s optional dress uniform.”

While issuing the uniforms later would also benefit the service’s drill sergeants, a final decision has yet to be made.

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New Dress Blues Uniform Makes Its Debut on Female Marine Graduates


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

Since 2013, the Marines’ new female dress blues have been in the making, thanks to initiatives led by Navy Secretary Ray Mabus. Now, the new uniforms, which are modeled after those currently worn by male marines, are finally here.

On November 16, the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island saw its first company of enlisted women graduate – with their new dress blue coat proudly on show. About 130 women graduated on the 16th with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, according to an announcement from the service.

While the coats are not yet mandatory for female marines as they’ve just been debuted, they will be mandatory in September 2022. Starting in October, both coats will be “optional to wear with the dress uniform.”

In addition to being modeled after male marines’ dress coats, the new female coat is “reminiscent of older uniform styles dating back to World War II.” The updated version will feature a higher collar along with a white belt and a waist plate. Unlike the men’s version, the updated female dress blues coat will not have pockets.

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Army Finalizing Design for Soldiers’ New Greens Uniform Coming in 2020


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

On Monday, Army Secretary Mark Esper gave his approval to adopt the recently announced Army Greens uniform. The Army Greens uniform is “a version of the iconic Pinks and Greens uniform Army officers wore during World War II.” Army officials wanted to “capitalize on the greatest generation because there is another great generation that is serving today.”

Though the uniform is not yet finalized, there is a rollout schedule in place. It will be as follows: New soldiers will receive Army Greens starting in the summer of 2020. Soldiers currently on active duty, in the National Guard, and Reserves will also be able to acquire the Army Greens then, but the uniform will not be mandatory until 2028. When the new uniform is mandatory, the current blue service uniform will become the army’s “optional dress uniform.”

While the phase-in period may seem long, it was designed as such to give soldiers an adequate amount of time to save their clothing allowances to cover the cost of the uniform. Exact costs have not been disclosed, but we do know that the Army Greens’ estimated cost is higher than that of the current service uniform. However, with the increased cost comes a higher-quality uniform with a longer lifespan.

Before the updated Army Greens uniform is issued to army personnel, the service plans to manufacture and issue approximately 200 uniforms to those in forward-facing positions, such as recruiters. Feedback from the initial uniform issue will inform the final design, which the service hopes will be a “comprehensive uniform design that soldiers like.”

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Everything You Need to Know About the New Army Greens Uniform


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Army Times

Though the army is still ironing out the specifics of its new Army Greens uniform, a contract and fielding timeline are in the works. The new uniform will not be made mandatory until 2028, so soldiers have plenty of time to purchase it. New soldiers may begin receiving it as early as 2020.

The Army Greens uniform draws inspiration from World War II-era uniforms and will include the classic “green ‘Marshall’ jacket, taupe pants and brown leather oxfords.” Soldiers will also have “three options for jackets, two for matching covers, and – for airborne units – the uniform team is working on a prototype of brown jump boots, according to Sergeant Major of the Army, Dan Dailey.

As for the cost of the uniforms, army leaders have not yet provided per set pricing, but stated that fielding them “won’t cost any more than what the service is spending for ASUs now.”

Below is what we know so far about the Army Greens uniform:

Soldiers will receive one foldable cap as “standard issue cover for the uniform,” while a circular cap and beret will be worn per commander guidance. Standard issue outerwear will come in the form of a long, green coat in a trench style, with three other optional jackets as well. Both of the shirts, the jacket, and pants are polyester blends. Finally, while a prototype of brown jump boots is in the works, they are not yet a reality.

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The Army Has a New Name for “Pinks and Greens” Inspired Uniform


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Stars and Stripes

According to Sgt. Major of the Army Dan Dailey, American soldiers will not be calling their new dress uniforms “Pinks and Greens,” but rather, “Army Greens.” While on a visit to Camp Zama in Japan, Dailey stated, “Pinks and Greens is a World War II nickname.”

Earlier in November, the Army announced that it would officially adopt the new design, which features brown pants with a pinkish tint and olive-colored jackets and is based on a World War II design as the new service uniform.

Officials anticipate rollout of the Army Greens uniform to begin in the summer of 2020, with all soldiers being required to wear it by 2028.

Army Recruiters will be the first to receive debut the new uniform to the public, Dailey added. He also noted that after a phase-in period, all active duty soldiers, including those in the National Guard and Army Reserve, will wear the new uniform.

The Army’s current uniform will not be entirely phased out. Instead, it will be worn as a dress uniform.

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