Gore among suppliers of material for US Army CTAPS project


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Shephard Media

The Army is moving forward with its plans to design preliminary clothing for its Cold Temperature and Arctic Protective System (CTAPS) program. The army’s Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Command (NSRDEC) outlined plans for its ‘prototype effort in a combined synopsis/solicitation’ on August 31.

The CTAPS program is anticipated to be a full outfit that will provide protection from the elements in cold temperatures from -65 F to +45 degrees F (-54 C to 7 degrees C). The goal of the program is to improve soldiers’ ability to survive in cold climates, while providing them with enhanced mobility, utility, and lethality using the least possible number of clothing layers.

Per August’s announcement, the NSRDEC identified ‘performance gaps’ and is currently ‘examining new technology and design improvements’ in an attempt to improve upon the Army’s 2000-era Generation III Extended Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS Gen III). The NSRDEC is working on concepts for three possible cold weather uniforms.

A fixed-priced contract will be awarded to one ‘innovative clothing design/cut/sew supplier’ to produce 84 Wet Weather Experimental Jackets and Trousers in six sizes, 78 Extreme Cold Experimental Parkas and Trousers in four sizes, and 100 Superfine Knit Shirts and Trousers also in six sizes, with each item being delivered by December 21 for a winter 2018-2019 field test. Results from the 2018-2019 test will determine whether or not they will move forward with development.

Gore is among the providers of fabric for the wet weather ensemble.

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Arc’teryx Presents – Who We Are: The Science Behind GORE-TEX®


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Our commitment to putting our best materials into the best garments is aided by our partnership with Arc’teryx Equipment.  20+ years of collaborating has let to the creation of a garment that can withstand all different tyipes of conditions, from New York City to Mount Everest. Watch this video to see how Gore and Arc’teryx continue to push each other to be the best.

 

Army Looking to Replace Its Current Cold Weather Boots


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Army Times

Earlier this month, the Army’s Contracting Command put a notice on fbo.gov, a website detailing federal business opportunities.

In the notice, the Contracting Command detailed its plans to procure 150 pairs each of three prototypes of an Extreme Cold Weather Overboot (ECWO), to replace its current version, the Extreme Cold Weather Boot (ECWB), which has been in use with soldiers and Marines since the 1960s.

The goal of the ECWO is to reduce the weight and bulk of Army boots, which are among the boot’s deficiencies described in the notice. The author also stated that the ECWB is “difficult to pack/carry when conducting dismounted operations.”

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U.S. Army Testing Three Overboot Prototypes for Extreme Cold Climates


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

The Army has chosen three companies to develop prototypes of insulated overboots which could replace the current Extreme Cold Weather Boot (ECWB).

According to a notice on FedBizOpps.gov, the ECWB in its current form has been “largely unmodified since the 1960s” and “uses outdated technology and manufacturing processes” that are not used anymore in the U.S. The boot is also known to be “heavy, bulky, and difficult to pack/carry.”

To determine what will replace the ECWB, Army officials intend to purchase 150 pairs of insulated overboots from each of the following manufacturers: Wiggy’s Inc., based in Grand Junction, CO, Outdoor Research out of Seattle, WA, and Original Footwear Co. in Stockton, CA. Per the notice, all contracts are anticipated to be fixed-price.

Army officials will “evaluate insulated overboot solutions with the potential to offer similar environmental protection at reduced weight/bulk.” The updated version will be referred to as the Extreme Cold Weather Overboot (ECWO).

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Belleville Boot Company and Vibram Introduce New Boot Sole for Icy Environments


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military Times

Outsoles for standard issue Army boots are often developed for use in places like deserts, jungles, and even on pavement. Successfully creating a rubber material that will stand up to use in slippery, icy environments, however, can be difficult.

At the 2018 Warrior Expo East, Belleville Boot Company and Vibram debuted boots featuring a new rubber compound they created to “fill the gap between inadequate grip and full blown ice climbing.” To showcase the new sole, the two companies created a display featuring a block of ice, which was placed at a 15-degree incline.

The rubber compound, placed on specific points within the tread, is used to grip icy, slippery surfaces. According to Belleville’s Chief Sales Officer, Glen Becker, it can also be used in snowy conditions.

The finished product will be an insulated boot using GORE-TEX materials and a Vibram grip on the outsole.

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Navy Tests Two-Piece Uniforms Aboard Ships as New Substitute for Coveralls


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: USNI News

The United States Fleet Forces Command is developing and testing a new two-piece uniform for 350 sailors from the Surface Warfare, Aviation, and Submarine communities. Sailors began testing the new flame-retardant uniforms aboard ships in June and will continue to test them through September.

These alternative uniforms provide another option for sailors on sea duty who aren’t required to wear coveralls—and may also be worn away from the work environment.

The three different types of uniforms being tested are as follows:
– A navy blue top and matching pants
– A light blue top with dark navy blue pants
– A khaki top and matching pants

The FFC is also testing an ankle work boot which features a steel toe and is similar in style to a Chelsea boot. To gather feedback about the new gear, the FFC created a survey, which prompted over 100 comments.

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Marines to Begin Testing Intense Cold Weather Boots and Socks


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

Military.com reports that the Marine Corps will soon begin testing new boots and socks for cold-weather temperatures ranging from -20 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit, temperatures not covered by the current boot inventory. The existing Temperate Weather Marine Corps Combat Boot was designed for wear in temperatures of 20 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit, while the Extreme Cold Weather Vapor Barrier Boot was designed for wear in extreme temperatures— from -20 to -65 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Marine Corps Systems Command will award two contracts for two kinds of Intense Cold Weather Boots and Intense Cold Weather Socks. The Belleville Boot Company and Danner Boot Company will supply 1,000 pairs of boots each. Additionally, 25,000 pairs of Intense Cold Weather Socks will be supplied by FITS Technologies and Ellsworth & Company, respectively.

The MCSC’s Program Manager for Infantry Combat Equipment will conduct a field evaluation of the new boots and socks from December 2018 to March 2019. The evaluation aims to collect feedback from marines who will wear the prototypes at training centers in Fort McCoy and Norway.

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Navy Testing New Working Uniforms for Sailors


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Navy Times

The U.S. Fleet Forces Command is overseeing testing of its new, two-piece fire-retardant uniforms to benefit sea-duty sailors or those working in operational units. The uniforms were developed to be worn by sailors at sea, in port, and during commutes off base, reducing the number of clothing changes required each day.

In addition to testing the new style, officials are also testing out three new color schemes. E-7 ranks and above will be testing khaki uniforms to and from work, while E-6 and under will test two uniforms: a navy blue top and trousers and a light blue top and trousers. Sailors testing the new uniforms will be issued four shirts and trousers, each in their assigned color scheme. They will also be testing flame resistant, moisture-wicking undershirts in four different colors.

Uniforms will be untucked, but the shirts and trousers can be easily tucked or bloused. While testing the updated uniforms, sailors will also wear a wide rigger’s belt, their existing ball caps, and their pin-on rank, insignia, and name tags. However, no new boots will be supplied for wear with the new uniforms. Testing of the new uniforms will run until September, with feedback about the new uniforms being collected by coordinators for each command and on the FFC’s website.

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Air Force Confirms There Is No Subliminal Message in Announcements for New Uniforms


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military.com

The United States Air Force will adopt the Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP) used by the Army for its new combat uniforms and plans to phase it in starting on October 1. To differentiate itself from the Army, the Air Force will use a “spice” brown for name tape, patches, and insignia.

Images used during the announcement of the new uniforms depicted an airman wearing a “Snowden” nametape. While Air Force officials say there are no subliminal messages, upon seeing images of the uniform, readers speculated about the use of the name. However, according to officials, the nametape belonged to Senior Master Sgt. Snowden. Air Force officials did not reveal her first name.

The Air Force is retiring the Airman Battle Uniform over the next three years and plans to replace it with the OCP. All airmen are expected to be wearing the new pattern by April of 2021. The transition is expected to cost approximately $237 million.

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United States Air Force Moves to Single Combat Utility Uniform


Written by W. L. Gore & Associates

Source: Military1.com

Air Force officials have announced that the service will be adopting the Army’s Operational Camouflage Pattern, or OCP, for its new single combat utility uniforms upon receiving feedback that it is the “best, battle-tested utility uniform available.”

The new OCP uniforms for airmen will feature name tape and lettering in a spice brown color, as well as tan T-shirts and belts. Most ranks will be in spice brown colored thread. Considerable work has been made to accommodate sizing concerns as well, particularly for women.

Rollout of the new uniforms will begin on October 1, 2018. Airmen who already own OCPs may wear them, and those who don’t will be able to purchase them with their increased clothing allowances from the following Army and Air Force Exchange Service stores: Aviano Air Base, Italy; Charleston Air Force Base, South Carolina; Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina; and MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. Uniforms will continue to be rolled out slowly, throughout October 2019, and the service will fully transition to OCPs by April 1, 2021.

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